Barley | Hordeum Vulgare

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Other Names

Barley Beta-Glucan, Barley Bran, Barley Grass, Barley Malt, Bêta-Glucane d’Orge, Cebada, Cereal Fiber, Dietary Fiber, Fibre Alimentaire, Fibre de Céréale, Green Barley, Green Barley Grass, Herbe d’Orge, Herbe d’Orge Verte, Hordeum, Hordeum Distichon, Hordeum distychum, Hordeum vulgare, Mai Ya, Malt d’Orge, Malt d’Orge Germée, Orge, Orge Germée, Orge Perlé, Orge Mondé, Pearl Barley, Pot Barley, Scotch Barley, Son d’Orge, Sprouted Barley, Sprouted Barley Malt.

Hordeum vulgare, green grass, mai ya in Chinese markets. The term mai ya could refer to either barley or wheat grass, but barley is preferred to wheat in traditional Chinese medicine. Gu ya, or rice shoots, are eaten as a food rather than taken as a medicine.

Description

Barley is a major cereal grain that comes from the grass family. It is widely cultivated and is now grown widely because it is a food staple. It goes back to as far as medieval Europe. It is a source of fermentable material for beer and certain distilled beverages and is an essential component of health foods.

It is self-pollinating and has 14 chromosomes. There is domesticated barley and wild barley, and they are very abundant in grasslands and woodlands, especially in undisturbed habitats like orchards and wide fields and roadsides. It grows throughout Western Asia and northeast Africa as wild.




Ingredients

Saturated fat, polyunsaturated fat, monounsaturated fat, sodium, cholesterol, potassium, carbohydrates, sugar, protein, vitamin A, vitamin D, calcium, vitamin B12, iron, magnesium, vitamin C.

Barley grass is an extraordinarily rich source of many vitamins, minerals, and amino acids, although it does not, as sometimes claimed, contain absolutely all the nutrients needed for human health.The dried shoot is approximately 4% glutamic acid (needed for recharging antioxidants), 4% methionine (needed for the production of natural SAM-e), 3% vitamin C, 1% valine, and 1% calcium. A single tablespoon contains a day’s supply of beta-carotene, betaine, biotin, boron, copper, iron, lutein, magnesium, niacin, riboflavin, and thiamine. It also contains nutritionally significant amounts of alpha-linoleic acid, oryzanol, potassium, selenium, zinc, and the tocopherols that make up vitamin E.The medicinal action of the dried shoot is due to its content of hordenine, not to be confused with a plant chemical with a similar name that is implicated in celiac disease.

Collection period

End of April to End of May

Used Parts

Kernel and straw.

The dried unjointed leaf. In traditional

Chinese medicine, the barley grass may

be “massed” or fermented before drying.

Uses

  • Preventing high cholesterol level,

  • Preventing stomach cancer,

  • Treating boils,

  • Controls blood sugar,

  • Promotes better nutrient absorption

Application

Barley has been used as animal fodder and is a fermenting ingredient for beer and other distilled beverage. It is used in soups and stews and is a main ingredient of flatbread for many cultures. It is also made into a malt using a traditional method of preparation. It is a natural sweetener.

Summary

A cereal grain, barley is a staple for many countries and has two varieties. It is also made into malt which is a natural sweetener and has the same effect on other beverages such as beer.

Side Effects

There are insufficient reports and evidence to determine if barley is safe for preventing colon and rectum cancer, Bronchitis, Cancer prevention, diarrhea, swelling (inflammation) of the stomach or bowel, boils, increasing strength and energy, weight loss, and other conditions.

References

  • Self Nutrition Data: Barley, Pearled, Cooked: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/5680/2-

  • Encyclopedia Britannica, Barley: http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/53494/barley-

  • Barley Foods, Industry Facts: http://www.barleyfoods.org/facts.html

 

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