Bennett | Geum Urbanum

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Other Names

Wood Avens, Herb Bennet, Colewort, Benedict’s Herb, Bennet’s Root, Benoîte, Benoîte Commune, Benoîte Urbaine, Benoîte Des Villes, Cariofilada, Colewort, Geum, Geum Urbanum, Herb Bennet, Herbe Bénite, Herbe Du Bon Soldat, Herbe À La Fièvre, Herbe De Saint-Benoît, Hierba De San Benito.

Description

Also called Herb Bennett, it grows in shady places such as woodland edges and hedgerows in the Middle East and Europe. It usually reaches a height of 20-60 centimeters and has flowers that are 1-2 centimeters in diameter with petals that are bright yellow. The flowers are scented which attract bees to complete the process of pollination. The fruits have burrs that are used for dispersal by getting caught in animals’ furs. The root is used in many soup recipes as a spice and flavoring.

Ingredients

Eugenol, Glucoside, Gein, Geum-Bitter, Tannic Acid, Resin, Gum, Water, Alcohol

Collection period

May to August




Used Parts

Leaves and Root

Uses

  • Catarrh,

  • Colic prevention,

  • Fever,

  • Fights snake venom,

  • Gout,

  • Halitosis,

  • Heals dog bites,

  • Heart disease,

  • Liver disease,

  • Mouth ulcer,

  • Rheumatism,

  • Stomach upset

Application

The root is used to flavor ale, and in many dishes as a spice. It is also used as an astringent, styptic, febrifuge, stomachic, antiseptic, tonic and aromatic.

Summary

Traced back many centuries, the herb is known to be sacred to the Roman god Jupiter and it has graced many column and architecture because of its foliage design. It is used as flavoring and spice in many dishes and can be an antidote against snake venom.

Side Effects

It might be unsafe to consume Bennett when pregnant; it could also affect the menstrual cycle and cause miscarriage.

References

  • CeltNet Recipes- Wild Food Guide For: Herb Bennet (Geum urbanum):http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/ancient/wild-food-entry.php?term=Herb%20Bennet-

  • Botanical.com, Avens: http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/a/avens083.html-

  • Wikipedia, Geum urbanum: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geum_urbanum

 

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