Blessed Thistle | Cnicus Benedictus

Other Names

St. Benedict’s Thistle, Blessed Thistle, Holy Thistle Or Spotted Thistle, Milk Thistle, Carbenia Benedicta, Cardo Bendito, Cardo Santo, Carduus, Carduus Benedictus, Chardon Béni, Chardon Bénit, Chardon Marbré, Cnici Benedicti Herba, Cnicus, Cnicus Benedictus, Holy Thistle, Safran Sauvage, Spotted Thistle, St. Benedict Thistle, Benediktenkraut, Cardo Santo, Centaurea Benedict, Кникус, Кникус Благословенный, Blaženi čkalj, Блажени чкаљ

Description

Blessed Thistle was used during the Middle Ages by the monks to treat the bubonic plague as a tonic. It is a biennial plant that has red to purple flowers with leaves that are shiny and pale. It is a native of Southern Europe to Asia. The ripe seeds are used for medicine.

Ingredients

Calcium carbonate (Tums, others), dihydroxyaluminum sodium carbonate (Rolaids, others), magaldrate (Riopan), magnesium sulfate (Bilagog), aluminum hydroxide




Collection period

June to October

Used Parts

Flowering tops, leaves,

and upper stems, seeds

Uses

  • Bacterial infection,

  • Colds,

  • Cough,

  • Diarrhea,

  • FeverIndigestion,

  • Treats boils,

  • Treats wounds,

  • Treats loss of appetite,

  • Promotes breast milk production for nursing mothers

Application

Blessed Thistle is also used as a diuretic to increase urine output. Also, it is prepared as a tea for mothers who need to lactate more. A gauze soaked in Blessed Thistle can be applied to the skin to treat wounds and boils. It is also used as a flavoring in some beverages containing alcohol.

Summary

It is prepared as a tea to remedy many conditions such as fever, cough, even loss of appetite and among lactating mothers, it contains cnicin to increase the flow of breast milk.

Side Effects

Look out for concentrated toxic and heavy metals contamination since Bladderwrack grows in the open sea. It is possible that arsenic could contaminate the water where it lives. It is not recommended for women who are attempting to get pregnant, Bladderwrack could jeopardize the chances.

References

  • Wikipedia, Cnicus: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blessed_thistle-

  • RXList.com, Blessed Thistle: http://www.rxlist.com/blessed_thistle-page3/supplements.htm-

  • Herb Health Guide, Blessed Thistle: http://www.herb-health-guide.com/blessed-thistle.html

 

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