Clivers

Other Names

Cleavers, Stickywilly, Stickyweed, Goosegrass, Stickyleaf, Catchweed, Stickyjack, Hairif, Clivers, Coachweed, Robin-run-the-hedge, Kisses, Stickybud, Hayruff, Love-man, Robin-run-in-grass, Mutton Chops, Barweed, Hedgeheriff, Hayriffe, Eriffe, Grip Grass, Scratweed, Tongebledes, Goosebill, Everlasting Friendhip, Amor del Hortelano, Amour du Hortelano, Barweed, Bedstraw, Caille-Lait, Catchweed, Cleavers, Cleaverwort, Coachweed, Eriffe, Everlasting Friendship, Gaille, Gaillet Accrochant, Gaillet Gratteron, Gallium, Galium aparine, Glouteron, Goose Grass, Goosebill, Gosling Weed, Grateron, Gratte-Langue, Grip Grass, Hayriffe, Hayruff, Hedge-Burs, Hedgeheriff, Herbe Collante, Love-Man, Mutton Chops, Rièble, Robin-Run-in-the-Grass, Scratchweed, Stick-a-Back, Sweethearts, Klabergras, Klebgras, Klimme, Hafta, Wundkraut, Zaunkleber, Прилип, Броћика, Броценика, Броценица, Броцика, Дивљи броц, Хватавац, Кореника, Прилипаца, Приљепача, Турица, Подмаре́нник це́пкий, Подмаренник льно́вый

Description

Clivers creep along the ground, even climb over the top of other plants. Clivers attach themselves with small hooked hairs, coming from its stems and leaves. Its stems reach up to three feet, even higher and are angular or sometimes square in shape. The leaves are narrow and are produced in six or eight whorls.

Clivers have tiny green or white star shaped flowers that bloom from spring to summer. They are clustered in groups of three. The fruits grow together and are also covered with hooked hairs aiding in faster seed dispersal.

Ingredients

Iridoid Glycosides, Monotropein, Phenolic Acid, Aucubin, Alkaloids, Caffeine, Flavonoids, Coumarin, Citric Acids, Iridoids, Aklanes, Tannins, Anthraquinones, Polyphenolic Acids, Vitamin C, Asperuloside, Glycoside, Saponins, Rubichlor Acid, Citric Acid, Acid Galitann, Alizarinthypus, Asperulosid, Trace Elements

Collection period

June-August

Used Parts

Whole herb. Usually the above ground parts of the plant, dried and chopped.

Uses

  • Bladder Stones

  • Blemishes

  • Bubble Gries

  • Cystitis

  • Diuretic

  • Eczema

  • Fingernail Ulcer

  • Inflammation Of The Tongue

  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease

  • Intestinal Problems

  • Kidney Stones

  • Lichens

  • Lowers Blood Pressure

  • Lowers Body Temperature

  • Overweight

  • Relieves Poisonous Bites

  • Remedy Against Burns

  • Renal Gravel

  • Skin Disorders

  • Skin Irritations

  • Stomach Disorders

  • Stomach Inflammation

  • Swollen Glands

  • Water Stagnation

Properties:

  • Astringent

  • Antispasmodic

  • Diuretic

  • Detoxifier

  • Diaphoretic

  • Tonic

  • Sedative

Application

As a tea, the plant is a diuretic and detoxifier. It is effective as a poultice and can be applied directly to the affected area. The dried herb can be added in a cup of boiling water. The asperuloside in cleavers is a mild sedative and can lower dogs’ blood pressure without disturbing their heart rate.

Cinnamon is a popular flavouring agent. It is widely used as a spice and is employed in cooking and goes very well with the preparation of chocolate. It is used in many desserts like apple pie, cinnamon buns and candies as well as drinks like tea, coffee and cocoa.

The barbed stems of Cleavers are used to make a sieve to strain milk. The matted foliage of the plant was used as mattress stuffing. The root can be used as a red dye.

Summary

Cleavers are a good remedy against burns and wounds. It can be used as a tea or wash and it helps to lower body temperature and blood pressure. It also addresses stomach disorders, intestinal problems and cystitis.

Side Effects

None known.

For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

References

  • Nature Gate, Cleavers: http://www.luontoportti.com/suomi/en/kukkakasvit/cleavers-

  • Kew, Royal Botanical Gardens: http://www.kew.org/science-conservation/plants-fungi/galium-aparine-cleavers-

  • Eat The Weeds, Goosegrass, Cleavers, Bedstraw: http://www.eattheweeds.com/galium-aparine-goosegrass-on-the-loose-2/

Clivers

Galium aparine

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