Cuckooflower

Other Names

Couillon de Chien, Couillon de Renard, Cuckoo Flower, Damette, Folle Femelle, Levant Salep, Morion, Orchid, Orchis Bouffon, Orchis Casque, Orchis Mascula, Orchis morio, Petite Dame des Prés, Sahlep, Salep Orchid, Saloop, Satirion Femelle, Satyrion, Soupe à Vin, Lady’s Smock, Lady’s-smock, Milkmaids, Meadowcress, Lucy Locket, Pigeon’s Eye, Mayflower, Bittercress, Серде́чник лугово́й, Steckbrief

Description

Charming and informal, Cuckooflower is a wildflower that is lilac-pink in colour. It looks dainty and is clustered at the top of the plant that grows 8 inches tall. It thrives in damp areas and blooms together with moisture loving wildflowers like primroses, daffodils and oxlips. Cuckooflower can be found in riverbanks, meadows and ditches. It is called Cuckooflower because it blooms in anticipation of the arrival of the first cuckoo which serves as a signal of spring time. Each flower typically has four petals but double flowered varieties have been spotted. According to folklore, the Cuckooflower is considered sacred to the fairies and is considered bad luck if brought indoors. It has been cited in Shakespeare’s Love’s Labour Lost 

Ingredients

Vitamin C, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, zinc

Collection Period

April to June 

Used Parts

Leaves and flowers 

Uses

  • Asthma

  • Chronic skin complaints

  • Hysteria

  • Promotes appetite

  • Scurvy

  • Treats indigestion

Properties

  • Antirhaumatic

  • Antiscorbutic

  • Antispasmodic

  • Carminative

  • Digestive

  • Diuretic

  • Stimulant 

Application

Best used when fresh, the leaves were used in salads in the absence of lettuce. Cuckooflower is also very important for butterflies and caterpillars as a food source. 

Summary

Apart from Cuckooflower being a decorative plant in the springtime, it also holds historical significance in the treatment of scurvy among ships’ sailors. It served well because of its Vitamin C content and the leaves are also a substitute in salads in the absence of lettuce. 

Side Effects

No side effects have yet been reported for Cuckooflower. 

References

  • Healeydell UK Files, Lady’s Smock: http://www.healeydell.org.uk/files/Ladys_Smock.pdf

  • Plants for a Future, Cardamine pratensis: http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Cardamine+pratensis

  • Nature Gate, Cuckooflower: http://www.luontoportti.com/suomi/en/kukkakasvit/cuckoo-flower

Cuckooflower 

Cardamine pratensis

Related Topics:

Herbs

List of Herbs

Table of Calories

Herbs Calendar

Market

Naturomania

Love

Health

Food

Life

Beauty

Psychology

Sport

Animals

Spirituality

Biodiversity

Herbal Medicine

Symptoms

Diseases

Natural Remedies

Recipes

Herbs for Psychological Imbalances

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*