Hawthorn

Other Names

Aubepine, Aubépine, Aubépine Blanche, Aubépine Épineuse, Bianco Spino, Bois de Mai, Cenellier, Chinese Hawthorn, Crataegi Flos, Crataegi Folium, Crataegi Folium Cum Flore, Crataegi Fructus, Crataegus cuneata, Crataegus kulingensis, Crataegus laevigata, Crataegus monogyna, Crataegus oxyacantha, Crataegus pinnatifida, Crataegus rhipidophylla, English Hawthorn, Epine Blanche, Epine de Mai, Espino Blanco, Fructus Crataegi, Haagdorn, Hagedorn, Harthorne, Haw, Hawthrone, Hedgethorn, LI 132, LI132, May, Maybush, Maythorn, Mehlbeebaum, Meidorn, Mespilus laevigata, Nan Shanzha, Noble Épine, Oneseed Hawthorn, Poire d’Oiseaux, Sable Épine, Shanzha, Shen Zha, Weissdorn, Whitehorn, WS 1442, WS1442, Crataegus laevigata (Midland hawthorn), Crataegus monogyna (English hawthorn), Aubepine, Bianco Spino, Crataegi Fructus, Crataegus cuneata, Crataegus oxyacantha, Crataegus pinnatifida, English Hawthorn, Epine Blanche, Epine de Mai, Haagdorn, Hagedorn, Harthorne, Haw, Hawthrone, Hedgethorn, May, Maybush, Maythorn, Mehlbeebaum, Meidorn, Nan Shanzha, Oneseed Hawthorn, Shanzha, Weissdorn, Whitehorn, Christdorn, Haakäsen, Hagapfel, Hagäpfli, Hagedorn, Hägele, Hagewiepkes, Heckendorn, Heinzelmännerchen, Mehlbaum, Mehlbeere, Mehldorn, Mehlfässchen, Müllerbrot, Weißheckdorn, Wibelken, Wubbelken, Wyßdorn, Zaundorn

Description

The folklore and legends surrounding the hawthorn tree is quite large, and goes back many centuries, especially in Europe and the British Isles. The most famous hawthorn in Britain is the Holy Thorn of Glastonbury, which grows at Glastonbury Tor, the supposed resting place of King Arthur. According to legend, the tree was grown after Joseph of Arimathea, upon arriving at Glastonbury Tor, thrust his staff into the ground, and from this the tree grew. Although the original is no longer there, several of its supposed descendents still grow there. When it blooms during the winter, a sprig is traditionally sent to the Queen, who is said to decorate her breakfast table on Christmas morning. Hawthorn fruit has long been used as a food and medicine in Europe; particularly Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Many clinical studies have been conducted on hawthorn over the past 20 years with great promise. The berry is a yellowish brown to wine-red, oval, wrinkled, and berry-like fruit (actually a pome).

Ingredients

Flavonoids and oligomeric procyanidins. The berries contain more hyperoside than the leaves and flowers, and the leaves and flowers contain more vitexin rhamnoside than the berries.

Used Parts

The whole berry, dried, crushed and powdered

Uses

Hawthorn berries are more often used to make tinctures than teas, smoothies and punches. May also be taken encapsulated or as an extract.

  • Heart failure, 

  • Reassuring, 

  • Blood circulation, 

  • Vasodilator, 

  • Age-related heart, 

  • Angina pectoris, 

  • Atherosclerosis, 

  • Dark circles, 

  • Hypertension, 

  • Exhaustion, 

  • Cardiac arrhythmia, 

  • Circulatory disorders, 

  • Nervousness, 

  • Low blood pressure, 

  • Irritability, 

  • Insomnia, 

  • Dizziness, 

  • Menopausal symptoms,

Precautions

Taken in excess, hawthorn berry teas can cause mild diarrhea. This does not occur when the berries are used to make tinctures or are encapsulated. Diarrhea is not a side effect of the leaf and flowers.

Taken in excess, hawthorn berry soft drinks, especially if they are made with the powder, can cause mild diarrhea. (Rice is added to the blend to prevent stomach upset.) Diarrhea does not occur as a result of using the herb when the berry powder is used to make tinctures or are encapsulated. Diarrhea is not a side effect of the leaf and flowers.

For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Hawthorn 

Crataegus monogyna

Related Topics:

Herbs

List of Herbs

Table of Calories

Herbs Calendar

Market

Share This

Naturomania

Love

Health

Food

Life

Beauty

Psychology

Sport

Animals

Spirituality

Biodiversity

Herbal Medicine

Symptoms

Diseases

Natural Remedies

Recipes

Herbs for Psychological Imbalances

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*